Worth the Effort

“Anyone may arrange his affairs so that his taxes shall be as low as possible…” While Judge Learned Hand was talking about federal income taxes, it can be applied to property taxes as well. Cut taxes - 300.jpg

States have a process of assessing the value of a property based on a number of things that can include size, amenities, location and what the owner paid for the property. Adjustments may be made to that value annually. Once it has been published to the owner, there is a process available for those who disagree with the value.

  1. Learn the assessment process and what the filing deadlines are to apply. Since different states have different requirements, it is important to know the process in your area.
  2. Obtain your assessment records – they are normally available online and you can find out how your value was determined. Check for mistakes in square footage, bedrooms, amount of land, etc. Then, verify if the comparable sales in the neighborhood support their position or not. Your real estate agent can be valuable in this area.
  3. Proceed to make your case from the lowest to the highest level necessary. It isn’t necessary to hire someone to represent you. Sometimes, just talking to employees at the tax assessor’s office may be enough. If not, there is a process for a hearing where you present your evidence and so does a representative from the assessor’s office.

Challenging your assessment really needn’t be an adversarial position. Their job is to assess a fair value and your goal is to not pay more than an equitable amount of taxes. Whether it be an employed assessor or a voluntary board, they have a job and they appreciate being treated professionally and courteously.

Keep this last thing in mind: the people you’re presenting your case to have the ability to lower your taxes.

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